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CEPPR Policy Document

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CENTRE FOR PEACE POLICY RESEARCH SIGNCEPPR is a  project of the International Institute of Peace Studies and Global Philosophy launched in July 2009. This work consolidates and extends the sustained interested shown by IIPSGP in formulating, articulating and advocating a rational peace policy for the UK, Europe and globally.

The enormous cost of not having thought through a serious peace policy has become all too apparent in recent years.

Founded in 1991 at the end of the Cold War, IIPSGP began its life as a project of the University of London.  It is an educational research institute that specialises in peace making and comparative religion and the scientific study of the role of ideas in society. It has organised over 33 meetings in the UK House of Lords to bring together MPs, Peers and NGO leaders to discuss the links between ethics and policy. IIPSGP is at the forefront of research and education on all aspects of global philosophical and ethical debates, interfaith research, and the in depth study of dialogue for concerted approaches to solving global problems involving both scientific and spiritual paradigms.

CEPPR will attempt to tackle the enormous vacuum created by the lack of serious debate in the UK and among its allies in thinking through the long term prospects of a peaceful international order. The UK and USA are competent at fighting military campaigns and winning conventional wars, but have failed abysmally to build long term peace, notably in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The problems of continuing mortality rates in Afghanistan on all sides, shows up the glaring lacuna of any serious thinking within UK government circles of a long term peace policy.

The discussion about levels of military aid and equipment being made available to UK forces in Afghanistan, although important, is actually missing the real issues concerning this war, in IIPSGP’s opinion.

Russian forces had huge numbers of helicopters for example, but this proved insufficient to defeat the then mujahedeen resistance fighters of the Afghan peoples. Even if Britain increased helicopter levels enormously, it is highly unlikely that mere military force would ever be sufficient to win this war on its own.

But what would victory actually be like? What are the actual human, social and peace goals towards which this campaign is directed? Obviously, it is to foster and encourage the creation of an eventual; Afghan society at peace with itself, and which does not export terrorism or armed violence to other states (e.g. Pakistan, India etc.).

But how will such a peace be eventually realised ? How can the will of the Afghan people themselves be involved in this project ? What levels of educational work and reparation will be needed ?  If armed resistance to foreign invaders is something that has been inbuilt into the Afghan psyche through the terrible years of Soviet occupation, how can even a relatively benign occupying power ever be expected to meet with other than armed resistance ?

These are some of the difficult questions that CEPPR will be asking, and furthermore they are questions which there seems to be a reluctance to ask, and an intellectual vacuum at present, among think tanks and specialised peace, conflict and security studies institutions.

CEPPR’s role is in thinking through the difficult policy options facing, firstly, the UK, but secondly Europe, and the international community, in framing, articulating, enunciating and devising an authentic, logical, coherent and cost effective approach to genuine peace building in our time. Following the successful conclusion to the disastrous years of the cold war, the citizens of the world were entitled to expect a period of peace, in which resources hitherto spent on militarism could have been diverted to social and environment projects. This didn’t happen. Instead new wars and conflicts were stumbled into by the political, financial and military elites of the planet, with apparently no concern for their impact on ordinary people’s lives worldwide. CEPPR holds equally responsible for the current chaos all those various warlords whose posturings and arrogance have caused years of chaos and social and financial insecurity on earth – but the intention is to research in exact details exactly how we got into the present chaos, and what alternative policies could have prevented the current situation from arising. Above all however, CEPPR’s work is forward thinking and future oriented. We are interested in analysing the events of the recent past, including the causes of the current wars and conflicts on earth, not least in Iraq, Afghanistan, Palestine, Israel and elsewhere in the Middle East, so as to propose an alternative peace policy in which lasting peace and security can be guaranteed for the citizens of all these countries. In this sense CEPPR is a pragmatic utopian project.

RESEARCH AREAS BEING UNDERTAKEN BY CEPPR

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy for the European Union (including a proposed European Union Mediation service); since 2008 IIPSGP has proposed the creation of an official fully staffed European Union Mediation service and has been having some success in getting this idea to trickle through into European bureaucracies; recently the European Union was awarded the Nobel Peace prize, perhaps partly because of their adoption of the ideas underlying the proposals promulgated by IIPSGP and CEPPR

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy for the United Kingdom

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy for the United States of America

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy for the Commonwealth

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy for the work of the police, judicial system and the administration of law and justice, so as to advance the generation of a more peaceful society

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy for victims of domestic violence

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to psychological research, investigating ht psychology of violence and the psychology of peace, cooperation and altruism

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to racial and ethnic conflict and violence

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to gender relations, gender identify, sexology and sexual violence, including homophobia

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to family life and the welfare of children

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to economic theory and economic policy, business activity and wealth generation, sustainability and green economics, fiscal studies, taxation law, company law, the economics of the arms trade and the economic impact of militarization on the global economy; arms spending and arms control, the economics of disarmament and transarmament, the lobbying influence of the military-industrial complex, the economics of new weapons research, the global economics of the security industry and the disparity in global spending on militarization versus peace and conflict prevention expenditure; in view of the catastrophic economic collapse of many countries worldwide, including Greece, Cyprus, and difficulties in Spain, Italy, Ireland, the USA etc. CEPPR wishes to consider the linkages of economic well being to peace and to galvanise thinking economic wealth when judged in militaristic terms; this will require a rethinking of economics as a discipline, and is something that John Maynard Keynes (Economic Consequences of the Peace) began to think through, and Lionel Robbins likewise (after whom the library at the LSE is named). The economics of peace needs developing as a viable academic field of study, much as Green economics has already been developed successfully. Kenneth Boulding, who supported the birth of IIPSGP, was another visionary economist who saw peace and wealth as interconnected, as was Fritz Schumacher.  This aspect of CEPPR’s work is of vital importance. A number of papers have already been prepared on this dimension of our research.

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to patterns of energy consumption, the growing scarcity of energy resources and the gradual diminution of energy supplies, and the increasing risk of energy conflicts.

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to social violence and unrest, including labour relations, strikes and industrial conflict and working conditions, as well as the impact of unemployment

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to drugs policy and criminalisation / decriminalisation debates

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to fundament\al philosophical issues, including religious conflict and violence, and metaphysical glorification of violence / non-violence as sanctioned strategies and responses

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to education, including the ways in which the values of peace and non-violence can be best advanced in educational settings, including in-school mediation services, responses to bullying, effective sanctions for violent behaviour, problems with discipline and violence (including verbal and physical violence) in today’s classrooms

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to inter-generational violence, including elder abuse, child abuse,  and the problems facing social workers in contemporary society

  1. To think through, research, conceptualise, articulate, publish and otherwise disseminate the parameters, possibilities and protocols of a viable peace policy in relation to environmental issues, global warming, and other ecological challenges facing mankind ?

OUTLINE OF ADDITIONAL ONGOING RESEARCH BEING WORK BEING UNDERTAKEN BY CEPPR

CEPPR will also be conducting research, analysis and advocacy among the following issues and topics:

  1. To monitor British peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, and in the absence of the them, to conduct empirical scientific research which can forcefully argue the point that the development of a rational peace strategy is more cost effective long term than developing a military strategy alone.

  1. To conduct research into the relationship between democratic institutions and peace policy – and to examine democratic pressures and processes at work in articulating and developing a coherent peace policy in modern democratic societies.

  1. To examine the processes underlying moves towards a peace policy throughout eh British Isles, in both England per se, but also in Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland – and to ask about respective political moves towards devolving military and peace strategy throughout the islands.

  1. To monitor French peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, and to examine the role that France has played hitherto in global conflicts, including their reluctance to get engaged in Iraq or Afghanistan, and how France’s ambiguous role within NATO has positioned it to prioritise peace rather than militarism as the first priority for France’s raison d’état.

  1. To monitor German peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion) and to conduct research in concert with German colleagues on the support for German military presence in Afghanistan and in other NATO theatres, and to consider what the long term absence or presence of a coherent peace policy means for German society at large and for German political and economic debates in general.

  1. To monitor Spanish peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion) and to examine the ways in which Spain has positioned itself in relation to ongoing global conflicts, including the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; to examine the impact of internal politics on Spanish society towards the articulation of a coherent peace policy., and also to ask whether Spain’s experience of being a bridge between the Islamic and Occidental worlds can provide an alternative model for the peaceful coexistence of Islamic, Christian and Jewish cultures in a civilised Mediterranean sphere of regional shared interests.

  1. To monitor Scandinavian peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, to consider ways in which Scandinavian society and values have long promoted peace as a preferable international; policy option than war and militarism, and to research empirically and scientifically how the Scandinavian advocacy of a coherent peace policy can be made more attractive for other national and international clusters of nations to adopt; to research the history of Scandinavia centuries long commitment to peace policy and to consider what issues and values might threaten or challenge it.

  1. To monitor peace initiatives in the USA (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, and to consider ways in which peace policy is or isn’t the first priority of different USA administrations; to examine the relationship between American popular culture and peace policy development (gun culture, violent crime, homicide levels, domestic violence, drug culture); to research the inner dynamics of American social conflicts (racial and civil) and their impact on global peace and conflict issues; to work with partner organisations in USA academic institutions to consider the apparent  absence of joined-up thinking in USA administrations on the need for a coherent peace policy both in the aftermath of serious armed conflict in which USA forces have been engaged and also in the period running up to the possibility of such conflict. To research the complex links in USA society among the military, industrial and intellectual elites, adept at formulating strategies based on war and violence and committing vast proportions of the USA national wealth to these goals, yet at the poverty of genuine joined up thinking on peace policy formulation or on a commensurate investment.

  1. To monitor Vatican peace initiatives, in both official governmental capacities, in terms of Papal policies and church teachings,  and also terms of initiatives from Vatican diplomatic channels, as well as local Episcopal or regional  church initiatives, aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, and the development of  a coherent peace policy – recognising the importance of research into Vatican peace policy in being both the single most populous religious denomination of earth, and also uniquely as comprising a legal nation-state in its own right, and also as having shown serious commitment over many centuries to the advocacy of peace policy as a paramount spiritual duty of its calling and raison d’être.

  1. To monitor Interfaith and inter-religious peace initiatives (in both intra- and interreligious fields) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion – to monitor developments inside all the religious communities on earth in terms of theological and  philosophical developments which promote peace, dialogue, tolerance, trust, rational discourse and the non=-violent resolution of religious differences – in short which advance the development of a peace policy within each religious community. To work with scholars and thinkers from each religious community in examining core texts, commentaries, legal documents and processes, which advance, promote and prioritise the development of peaceful ways of solving conflicts over violent means of solving conflicts.

  1. To monitor NATO peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) including NATO’s Partnerships for Peace programme and related initiatives, aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, and to monitor thinking inside NATO’s policy formulation echelons, including the NATO parliamentary assembly; to consider ways in which NATO’s membership procedures can be developed without causing offence to non-NATO members, or perhaps to welcome inclusive membership of NATO (e.g. both Georgian and Russian simultaneous accession to NATO membership); to assist with reformatting NATO’s mission in a post cold war world to genuinely and rigorously promoting in depth peace development as a matter of first priority, and to conceive of itself as a war fighting alliance only as a last resort.

  1. To monitor European Union peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion; to work with other European research and advocacy institutes to develop the model of the proposed European Union Mediation Service (EUMS); to monitor developments on peace policy within the European Parliament, the European Council of Ministers, and the developing mechanisms of the European Union as a whole. Top monitor the development of a converted approach to European Union foreign policy and the possibility of the European Constitutional Treaty becoming adopted and to work towards the including of a clause that the first priority of the European Union in any given dispute is to develop, maintain and advance peace and amicable relations between and within nations, not only throughout the European continent as a whole, but worldwide, not least by developing a European Union Mediation Service within the EU itself and making its expertise available worldwide.

  1. To monitor United Nations peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, and to encourage UN institutions (UN Security Council, UN General Assembly, UNESCO, UNEP, UNDP, UNIFEM, UNICEF etc.) to develop the kind of joined up thinking and practice that can lead towards the development of a coherent peace policy; to examine and research honestly and rigorously the failings within the UN systems which prevent the lack of peace policy: national rivalries, rhetorical disputes, bureaucratic inertia, financial corruption and malpractice, the glossing over of fundamental barriers and blockages on peace thinking, lack of funding and finance to implement UN policies, lack of connect between UN policies and programmes and the citizenry of different nation states who sometimes regard the UN as an interfering outside body of no important etc. To conduct joint research work with UNESCO and other structures within the UN, and the Academic Council on the UN (ACUNS) as well as with the UN ambassadors and their various advisors, including UK secretariat, to sharpen and advise and consult on the potential of the UN in formulating a global peace policy that could be adopted as a matter of priority by the UN General Assembly and Security Council, and which could also include recommendations on UN reform itself as part of a new global peace settlement.

  1. To monitor Commonwealth peace initiatives (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, and to encourage Commonwealth  institutions (Commonwealth Heads of Government meetings, Commonwealth Secretariat, Commonwealth Games, Commonwealth of Learning, Commonwealth networks of experts e.g. doctors, lawyers, judges, police, military professionals, scientists, teachers, Commonwealth governmental ministers, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the Commonwealth Teachers Grouping and the Commonwealth Consortium for Education. etc.) to develop the kind of joined up thinking and practice that can lead towards the development of a coherent peace policy for the Commonwealth as a whole and to support the work of individual commonwealth countries in developing initiatives and ideas and institutions to put the commonwealth at the head of peacemaking and conflict prevention procedures worldwide, and to work alongside UN, EU and other such initiatives.

  1. To monitor peace initiatives in the Russian Federation (in both governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental sectors) aimed at conflict prevention, conflict reduction and peace promotion, and to consider ways in which peace policy has been developed and articulated over the lifetime of different Russian and previously Soviet administrations; to examine, research and explore the  relationship between Russian  culture in general and peace policy development; to liaise with Russian intellectuals and to analyse the way in which the Russian intelligentsia generally has been able to articulate a coherent peace policy or not, and the constraints under which it operates, both before and following the downfall of communism, and to compare and contrast the different layers and meanings of political rhetoric concerning peace within the successive styles of political culture (Communism, liberalism, national populism etc.). To consider the extent to which current Russian thinking in both political and civil society can contribute towards the genuine development of a global peace policy in the post cold war era, and also based on its strategy of disengagement from Afghanistan as an “unconquerable country”. TO research h the feasibility and desirability of Russia joining NATO. To research the solution of the outstanding difficulties in Russian-Western relations, including the problems of NATO enlargement, of the developing of a security shield on Russia’s Western borders etc. Top research the long term problematic of Russia’s demographic time bomb an d its likely effects on long term peace policies. To research the roots of peace thinking with Russian culture, including in Christian teachings, philosophy and theology, not least the Tolstoyan traditions of non-violence).

  1. To monitor policy developments in specific conflict situations, both in intra and inter-national conflicts,  and to conduct empirical and scientific research, in concert with actors on the ground, towards developing coherent and pragmatic peace policies for the resolution of such ongoing conflicts, including in the Middle East, Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Tibet, Turkey, Kurdistan, Chechnya, Africa, Latin America, Balkans, Eastern Europe, Ireland etc.

  2. To monitor the development of initiatives in peace education in schools, colleges and universities in the UK and internationally, and to research ways of reducing crime, violence, conflict and bullying in schools and educational institutions; to monitor and research the rise of violent behaviour in the classroom, incidents of violence between pupils, and between pupils and teachers; to monitor and research the statistics of suicides among teaching staff (due to pressure of management styles and external inspection regimes) on a country by country basis; to research the dynamics of discipline maintenance in different teaching regimes and to consider what accounts for the current breakdown of discipline in schools in many European and Western countries, and the sharp rise of youth violence; to research the relationship between gang culture, drug culture, knife violence and adolescent hormonal behaviour. To research the physical and murderous attacks on teachers worldwide in some cultures (for religious and ideological reasons) and to devise policies which could lead to their cessation. To research the feasibility of joined up thinking as regards the creation of a genuine peace policy for education – that schooling should cease to be the experience of daily violence (mental, physical and verbal) and become a haven instead of calm, order, quiet, and disciplined, pleasant and polite learning, in which delight for learning and study replaces delight in disruption and disorder. To research the feasibility of developing a global Education Aid Day to fund raise for educational work worldwide, not least for peace education initiatives. To research the feasibility of developing mediation and conflict resolution services in schools worldwide and the UK by policy directive, as mandatory in all schools, and properly funded, to resolve conflicts through mediation involving both staff and pupils, and to prevent the growing climate of litigation affecting and poising school atmospheres. Top research the effectiveness of teaching trade unions at developing peace policies in and for education. To research the impact of government led directives and initiatives on school well being, and the increasing obsession with targets, examinations, micro-assessment and reporting, and micro-management, and to research the relationship between such a managerialistic approach to education and the rise of violence in schools – both in the UK and internationally. To think through what philosophical models of education actually produce well rounded, humane, kind, decent, non-violent, intelligent and loving young people, and which models of education produce frenetic, competitive, violent, angry and disturbed citizens – and to consider developing educational policies which result in the former rather than the latter.

  1. To monitor current thinking in counter terrorism circles, and to examine and research then ways in which terrorism is seen and perceived across different cultures and intellectual communities; to conduct research into the mind set of terrorists, and how the glamour associated with martyrdom has become associated with particular religious or spiritual ideologies (e.g. in Islam) and what alternative policies can be developed to counter these extreme mindsets, apart from surveillance, policing, imprisonment and extreme counter force. To recognise that terrorism is first and foremost a belief system and an ideology, that extreme violence can in some circumstances be justified if it ushers in a final goal of a just and peaceful and ordered society – and to conduct research into alternative and rival mindsets, which support and endorse non-violence ways of achieving some of these same goals; to research the parameters of an alterative intellectual framework, joyism, which can out-think terrorism as an acceptable or intelligent response to situations of injustice.

CEPPR will conduct research in each of the above areas of discourse and analysis, with a view to achieving in each domain practical and realistic peace policy initiatives which can

  1. Be less costly than military strategies in the long run

  2. Safeguard and preserve human lives, including the lives of military combatants

  3. Enable a gradual scaling down of global military expenditures year on year to a final level of 5% of current global expenditures (1.2 trillion dollars ie. 1200 billion – or 1,200,000,000,000  dollars p.a. in 2008) asap.

  4. Enable a shift of global wealth and economic activity towards long term economic and social well being activities (health, education, wealth and business creation, new sustainable industries, intellectual and cultural capital development, spiritual and emotional well being, happiness and enlightenment etc.)

  5. Enable mankind in the shortest possible realistic time frame to achieve a planetary peace settlement in which conflicts can hitherto be resolved by non-violent discussion, analysis, debate and healthy democratic political processes, and in which physical force solutions are seen as outmoded and passé.

VISITING FELLOWS

  1. CEPPR from time to time appoints as visiting fellows, scholars of international significance who are making a contribution to ongoing debates and research in the field of peace policy. Ros Cook, who spoke at the Poseidon Seminar at CEPPR in November 2012, has been recently appointed as a CEPPR Visiting Fellow, with a brief to research current thinking about the legality of nuclear weapons worldwide and international campaigns to create an effective treaty process to abolish nuclear weapons worldwide, as well as in specific regions such as Africa and the Middle East, and how this work impacts on thinking through an effective global peace policy affecting nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction. Ros Cook is also researching the ethical and philosophical and spiritual impact of weapons of mass destruction on human consciousness and society as part of her ongoing work, and why the development of a peace policy for mankind ifs a moral and spiritual imperative as well as a legal one.

  2. To be considered for appointment as a CEPPR Research Fellow please contact our office in writing and send us a CV.

FURTHER INFORMATION

 1. CEPPR is based physically at the Castle of the Muses, in Scotland, on Loch Goil, In Argyll and Bute, on the West Coast of Scotland, and has been here since September 2010.

 2. Scholars of peace and conflict resolution, and peace policy are welcome to come and visit on study retreats and to make use of the large library to write up their own research papers, by individual arrangement

 3. CEPPR has published so far three research papers, one on an outline of its general areas of research expertise, one on Afghanistan and the need for a peace policy; and one on the ongoing Syria crisis and the need for an effective peace policy. A further paper on peace policy and the Korean situation is in preparation.

 4. The Director of CEPPR, Dr. Thomas Clough Daffern PhD is available for lectures, debates, media interviews and consultancy work, subject to time pressures, and can be contacted at the Castle of the Muses. Dr. Daffern is a philosopher, historian, poet, author, lecturer, musician, thinker, educator, consultant and peace studies specialist. His academic background includes degrees in European and world history (with political philosophy) and a long period of intense personal study in philosophy, religion and the history of ideas – together with over 30 years teaching experience in the same fields. He has also trained and practiced in conflict management within communities and schools, specialising in multifaith and multicultural mediation. He was awarded his PhD from the University of London for a thesis which explores the history of the search for peace from 1945-2001 and which proposes a new field of historiography, Transpersonal History, as the best way to establish a rigorous discourse on peace among rival and contending spiritual and intellectual traditions, currently battling for hegemony on the planet. He is an expert in research techniques and methodologies on all aspects of history, religious studies, the history of world philosophy and transpersonal psychology. He has lectured in peace studies, philosophy and religious studies for many years at the Universities of London and Oxford, and has spoken at the UN Headquarters about the role of Universities in changing the climate of fear and violence on the planet to one of trust and wisdom-seeking. He is a founder and coordinator of International Philosophers and Historians for Peace and has worked with philosophers and intellectuals from many countries worldwide to help establish intellectual and spiritual networks for peace and goodwill. In 1990 he was elected in Moscow as Coordinator of International Philosophers for Peace, a specialist body of philosophers worldwide searching for peace and interntioanl understanding. He has published over 30 books, lectured, taught and travelled in over 33 countries worldwide, and has received various prizes and awards from international educational bodies. Further information on his background and specific skills are available on request. His publications are available at: http://www.lulu.com/iipsgp

 5. CEPPR has a facebook page where it regularly posts items of topic value at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Centre-for-Peace-Policy-Research-CPPR/207272562042?fref=ts

 6. CEPPR collaborates closely with other IIPSGP projects, and runs the annual Poseidon Seminar on the future of Britain’s Nuclear Deterrence option, not least in relation to the desire of the people of Scotland to become a non-nuclear weapons country; the Poseidon Seminar works with other organisations working for a nuclear disarmament worldwide, achieved through international treaties, and aims to assist the transfer of resources of expenditure from nuclear weapons technology worldwide towards more useful and peace oriented expenditure for a sustainable world society. Both eh Poseidon Seminar and CEPPR are academic research projects rather than advocacy organisations, but, as Fichte said, “Thinking is also an activity”.

 7. CEPPR encourages peace research in universities worldwide and is will and able to assist with the establishment of such research centres in universities currently lacking such a focus. Whereas military and defence and security research is a huge industry worldwide, with massive budgets, there is relatively small amount of expenditure on peace research, and virtually nil on peace policy. CEPPR is the first academic project in the world to call for the development of peace policy research as a major lacuna in international relations thinking worldwide.

 8. CEPPR is setting up a specific website to publicise its own activities and research projects on wordpress which is at:

 9. CEPPR works closely alongside the Global Green University, which is an alternative and complementary academic network of scholars and scientific researchers interested in thinking through the parameters of a global peaceful and ecological sane world society. THE GGU can provide academic tuition and supervision for advanced students wishing to research all aspects of peace policy both in the UK and internationally. Please contact us fro further information on how to register as a student of the GGU. Note that the GGU is a research only university at the current time, and research degrees only can be awarded on the successful completion of either an MPhil or a Phd. To be considered as a candidate for admission to our higher degrees programme, please email us with some basic information about your academic career to date. Unlike other Universities, costs to study with the GGU are kept to an absolute basic minimum as staff volunteer their time for free, believing that education is s human right, not a business. We advocate a world which spends more in education than on weapons and wars, and have decided to live “as if” that is already the case. The scandal of youth unemployment across the UK and Europe, and worldwide calls for emergency responses of maximum creative and collective intelligence. IIPSGP and the work of the GGU are part of that emergency response.

 10. CEPPR is seeking funding by like minded visionary entrepreneurs and financial investors who can realise the importance of developing an effective peace policy for the planet and who realise that ultimately, the current vast expenditures worldwide on militarism are unsustainable. For further information please contact our funding team. Currently the staff who work with CEPPR do so on a voluntary basis.

 11. CEPPR is technically “neutral” on the current question of the removal of nuclear weapons from Scottish soil, and the independence of Scotland from the rest of the United Kingdom, to be put to he people of Scotland in a referendum in September 2014; it does however advocate a lively and rigorous debate of these important moral and political questions, and to that end is inviting to the next Poseidon Seminar on November 2 2013, representatives of the Scottish independence campaign (Yes Scotland) and Better Together, who campaign for keeping Scotland inside the UK. CEPPR will be preparing a paper on the options for Scotland and the UK and the future of the UK’s Nuclear weapons in time for this seminar. CEPPR propose simply that the policy options should be set out clearly before the people before they decide, and that the option most likely to lead to a peaceful world should be chosen.

 12. CEPPR is located close to the Faslane nuclear submarine base and Coulport Mountains in Scotland, where the entire nuclear weapons arsenal of the UK are stored. It is also close by the Faslane Peace Camp which since 1982 has campaigned to have this base converted to peaceful purposes and to highlight the moral and scientific issues raised by nuclear weapons development and deployment and use.

For further information on any of the above, please contact IIPSGP Director, Dr. Thomas C. Daffern, who is also available for interview on any of the above points, who is available on iipsgp@educationaid.net or on 01301 703053.

 Further information is also available from IIPSGP Media Coordinator, Nicola Hague, on:  +44 (0)1301 703053 or email nicola.iipsgp@gmail.com

 For visitors CEPPR is located at The Castle of the Muses, Carrick Castle, Loch Goil, Argyll; and Bute, Scotland, UK, PA24 8AG.

 Further information on all aspects of IIPSGP and CEPPR is available at www.educationaid.net

The IIPSGP1 You Tube channel also carries much material of direct relevance to the work of CEPPR.

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1 Comment

  1. […] Minister) on each occasion. The full text of this proposal has been published and is available at https://ceppr.wordpress.com/policy-proposal/) The idea was also independently suggested to the UK Foreign Minister proposing that the UK should […]

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